mercoledì 26 novembre 2014

Africa and its tragedy: al-Shaabab contend AMISOM.


Middle East, Syria and Iraq, Africa, the Sahel and Mali, Somalia and Nigeria, terror and insecurity characterize the daily life of millions of people helpless and resigned victims of a political game which often do not know, and worse do not understand.
The terror spread is the result of power-games that feed in favor of certain centers of power that exploit the misery of the local population with a dualism both cynical and abject. It is an absurd game whose protagonists create militias, fideist or secular, fueled by people recruited in most neglected classes, as easily seduced by money, which then are sent to fight a war that paradoxically involves the same local communities to whom they belong, that are directly affected and expendable target in a clash between terrorism/insecurity and instability, and the central power that is supposed to guarantee safety. Once again the only losers -in any case and anyway- are the poor communities and neglected land increasingly at the mercy of events determined by strategies decided elsewhere. 
The battle between security and insecurity will affect  the future of entire nations in international theaters increasingly riotous to bend to any rule and so creating  a new form of the Middle Ages or a-polarity World in which the powers have increased and affect the dynamics of any nation. 
In Somalia, for years, the heirs of the Islamic Courts, clot of economic interests and various warlords, an organization founded on the ashes of the civil war of the Eighties, the young Islamic radicals of al-Shaabab, militia affiliated with the franchise of al-Qaida, is contrasting the central government supported by the international community and by the forces of the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM), operation of the regional African Union peacekeeping under UN auspices. 
This internal conflict in Somalia invests the daily life of the communities that increasingly become unwitting victims of  absurd atrocities. The most emblematic case concerns land forces counterinsurgency provided by Kenya AMISOM operating in Somalia confronting the militia of Shaabab. It has triggered a perverse exchange of military operations and reprisals damaging victims who are mostly civilians. Everything was radicalized in 2012 when Kenyan forces forced to withdraw the Islamic militia controlling at that time the commercial port Kysmaio and so interrupting a consistent flow of capital generated by the control of smuggling of coal to the countries of the Arabian Peninsula managed by al-Shaabab.
In retaliation, the latter brought the clash directly in Kenya homeland making a suicide bombing in the commercial center of Westgate Mall in Nairobi that killed 70 people. Most recently, on November 21 the Kenyan police raided a mosque in Mombasa and arrested some young people believed to be affiliated with al-Shaabab, seizing weapons and documents. The answer is not long in coming, and in fact the following 28 an armed militia took revenge and seized a busload of fishermen who went to business in the capital Nairobi. The commandos stopped the vehicle in Kenyan territory and go after leaving the Muslims and murdering 28 Kenyan citizens; the choice of victims was dictated by a macabre ritual: those who did not know how to recite the verses of the Quran were gunned down on the spot with a shot to the head. So, once again, the victims of this new age of terror are nothing but poor people in search of survival but sometime finding nothing more than a mocking death.